Pickled Tea Leaves
Food and Life in Myanmar
Traditional Burmese Sour Soup

Traditional Burmese sour soup: it is served in most restaurants, alongside platefuls of rice and little dishes with different curries. You can pour spoonfuls of it onto your rice and mix it with a curry, or you can just drink it right out of the bowl. Usually the restaurant staff will keep refilling your bowl of sour soup unless you ask them to stop; I rarely ask them to stop—such...

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Coconut Milk Noodles

Coconut Milk Noodles (Ohng No Khao Swe) “Coconut milk noodles” – that is the direct translation from the Myanmar name for this dish. A lot of dishes here have simple and sometimes vague names—“Chinese Muslim fried rice”, “wide fried noodles”, “soaked, long and fried”—names which do not always explain the flavor, contents, or texture of the dish. I struggled to give this recipe a proper title in English, afraid that...

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Easy Dulce de Leche

Dulce de leche translates from Spanish to mean, literally, "sweet of milk." It is creamy, thick, and is, in essence, caramel. Dulce de leche is made with sugar and milk, but can easily be made by heating sweetened condensed milk for a number of hours. A couple summers ago, when I first made dulce de leche, I submerged a can of sweetened condensed milk in a pan of water, brought it...

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Beansprouts and Tofu, lightly fried

I am typically not a huge fan of either bean sprouts or tofu. However, this particular arrangement of the two has become a new favorite in our house. Some days, I don’t get to the market early enough to get the best meat, and some days, I just don’t feel like cooking meat; these sorts of days often come on the heels of meat purchases that proved to be tough...

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Burmese Sour Soup

Sour Soup (Chin Hin) When we moved here last January, one of the first dishes I fell for was sour soup. It is served alongside curry dishes at many small curry and rice shops, and you usually are served a bottomless bowl of the stuff. There are a ton of variations on it, and I hope to share more of them with you in the months to come. This soup...

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Roasted Butternut Squash with Carmelized Onions

This post hopefully ends the longest period of silence on the blog for the foreseeable future. Shortly after launching this blog in April, I got a case of heat exhaustion in the 100+ degree weather, and from then on I spent about 12 hours a day in bed for the remainder of my pregnancy. After giving birth and a few weeks of some postpartum health drama, we’re slowly easing into...

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Mundi in the Morning

  About one half of a mile from our gate, there is a little shop we like to frequent. It runs out of a tiny street side home with thin metal walls and a corrugated metal roof. The patrons eat outside of this edifice under brightly colored umbrellas. We can tell whether or not it is open as soon as we turn off our street, as the child-sized tables and...

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Why Pickled Tea Leaves?

I first visited Myanmar in 2013, and one of the first dishes I tried was called lahpet tho (click for image) or what speakers of English would call pickled tea leaf salad. I loved it, and ate plenty of it. There are a variety of ways in which lahpet tho is served, but it is almost always brought to the table at the end of a meal. It will come on a...

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